Abuse during Coronavirus

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Depression, Coronavirus and Abuse Pandemic
Coronavirus and Abuse Pandemic

It's with mixed feelings I found this brief news segment, as I am glad to see this being addressed in the media, which I suspect at least hope that there will be more awareness and resources offered in the upcoming weeks. Still, of course, I am concerned about the reality of this silent-deadly crisis being faced in the midst of the Coronavirus, and that's of  Domestic Violence (DV). In fact, I assume most types of abuse may increase in numbers given that many are being asked or even mandated across the states and countries to isolation (social distancing), leaving them to be more vulnerable.

 

If on a daily basis, so many people are victims of abuse, imagine now that they are cut off of outlets that might have provided safety (time away from the abuser, cool-down period, etc.). Victims and the general population need to be aware that despite the isolations being required to stay safe from the Coronavirus, that they can seek help and resources to remain safe from other potential dangers that they may be living in. I hope the Coronavirus does not instill more fear in the victims (helpless) or empower the abusers to keep the victims more isolated and vulnerable. Unfortunately, this is very probable.

 

Though the Coronavirus has proven to be deadly to some, there has been no restriction of going out for the benefit of people's wellbeing, such as essentials, which would include seeking help medically, mentally, and even law enforcement (police). So, I encourage ALL not to REMAIN SILENT if you are experiencing abuse or know someone who may be experiencing or living in an environment that seems hostile and unsafe to seek help, as all HOTLINES remain active. And first, responders are still working, including MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS.

 

Though most clinicians may be doing Telehealth at this point, which is not typically recommended for those in crisis such as DV, especially with critical mental health symptoms and conditions needing more attentive care (in person), for some, this is a helpful option (less "severe" cases) to continuing therapeutic services (alleviating some symptoms, developing a plan, etc.) or even start. Telehealth is DEFINITELY very helpful in this time of isolation.

 

Every case is unique, and only those being victimized may know the level of risk/danger they find themselves. There is no simple way to provide safety and end abuse, as there are too many variables to consider, and quite frankly, what may work for one person may not work for another, such as some typical cliché coping strategies. I wish I can provide more positive optimism, but I don't want to minimize the severity and complexity of abuse and then add the current health pandemic. Perhaps those of us on the outside should pay attention to our neighbors and loved ones to offer support and encouragement.

 

I found the following site EXTREMELY helpful for all families filled with tips, as they recognize the challenges of adjusting to parenting and just co-existing for long periods of time, which they are not accustomed to. For some, the isolation may bring them closer to some degree (quality time), but for others, this stay at home "order" may be driving them nuts, forcing them to interact and do things they may not be accustomed to like having to now homeschool. The biggest challenge across the board abuse or no abuse is everyone needs at some point their own time to decompress, and most are not getting it. Therefore, many may be lashing out at another, causing abuse to continue, escalate, and for some, unfortunately, even start. PLEASE SEEK HELP NOW as these stay at home conditions may last a long time.

 

https://preventchildabuse.org/coronavirus-resources/

 

Some other resources

Crisis Texting Hotline - Text Home to 741741

www.rainn.org

www.thehotline.org

www.twitter.com/ndvh

www.womenindistress.org

Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Dr. Arias Shah: melissa@ensominds.com 888-995-3676

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